U.S. Support for the Global Fund

The United States made the world’s first contribution to the Global Fund with the support of President George W. Bush and bipartisan backing in Congress. The United States remains the largest single donor to the organization today under the Presidency of Barack Obama. Strong, continued and bipartisan U.S. support has proved critical to the Global Fund’s success and its ability to spur contributions from other donors.

Fiscal Year 2016

On Feb. 2, 2015, the Obama Administration released its budget request for Fiscal Year 2016, including $1.107 billion for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

For more information, please refer to Friends’ press release on President Obama’s FY 2016 budget request.

On June 11, the House Appropriations Committee passed its FY 2016 appropriations bill for the Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs, which recommended up to $1.35 billion for the Global Fund.

For more information, please refer to Friends’ press release.

On July 9, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved its FY 2016 appropriations bill for the Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs. The bill provided $1.35 billion for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

For more information, please refer to Friends’ press release.

On September 30, Congress agreed to a short-term continuing resolution (CR) to fund the government at FY 2015 levels until December 11, 2015, ensuring that the U.S. contribution to the Global Fund remains level at $1.35 billion. The CR will allow for Congress to engage in further negotiations on a longer-term budget deal to fund the government through the end of FY 2016.

On December 18, Congress passed, and President Obama signed, an Omnibus spending bill to fund the government for the remainder of FY 2016. The Omnibus provides a total of $8.5 billion for global health programs, including: $1.35 billion for the U.S. contribution to the Global Fund; $4.32 billion for the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR); $674 million for the President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI); and $236 million for USAID-funded tuberculosis programs.